2020/21 vet school admissions and entrance requirements

Vets students at Liverpool University

Are you thinking about applying to veterinary school in the UK? Do you want to know more about each of the different universities, what grades you need and what life’s like there? Look no further!

Below is a summary of each of the Veterinary Schools Council’s (VSC’s) member veterinary schools, including information about the courses, number of applicants/places and work experience requirements.*

If you want to find out even more about each vet school, this PDF from the VSC gives full information on each vet school

Click on each university for further information:

University of Bristol
University of Cambridge
University of Edinburgh [Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies]
University of Glasgow
University of Liverpool
Royal Veterinary College (RVC)
University of Nottingham
University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine 

There are two members of the VSC which are not located in the UK:

  • Further information on the course at University College Dublin may be found here or by contacting vetprogrammes@ucd.ie.
  • Further information on the course at Utrecht University may be found here.

There are two new vet schools in the UK, Harper & Keele Veterinary School and Aberystwyth School of Veterinary Science. Both are yet to be accredited by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS), and therefore are not VSC members:

Harper & Keele Veterinary School 
Aberystwyth University School of Veterinary Science 


Widening participation at UK veterinary schools

UK vet schools want to increase the participation of under-represented groups in veterinary education and the veterinary profession – in particular, participation from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) candidates. These groups and under-represented in the profession probably because BAME students are more likely to have experienced educational disadvantage and are less likely to have considered or been encouraged to consider veterinary medicine as a career.

UK vet schools are also strongly encouraging applications from candidates who have experienced educational or financial disadvantage. An overview of widening participation at UK veterinary schools can be found here

*Work experience requirements

All the UK vet schools are aware that the Covid-19 pandemic will have affected many applicants' opportunities to gain work experience before they apply. The UK vet schools have reviewed their requirements for work experience and further details are available on each university's website. There is also an online programme available that can be counted towards work experience requirements.


University of Bristol

Bristol university

Why apply?

Ranked in the world's top 15 vet schools (QS World University Rankings by Subject)Bristol vet school equips its graduates to pursue a range of careers within the veterinary profession.

Dual campus teaching means that students can experience both the vibrant culture of Bristol's city Clifton campus and the first-rate clinical facilities at the rural Langford campus. Years 1-3 are mainly spent on the Clifton campus, although at least one day a week is spent at Langford, just a short journey from the city. Teaching in years 4 and 5 takes place on the Langford campus, which offers its own small animal hospital, a dairy farm, diagnostic laboratories, a commercial abattoir and farm animal, small animal and equine practices.

The vet school's student society runs a 'family system', which pairs new students with 'parents' in older study years to help them settle in and act as mentors.

Widening participation 

The Gateway to Veterinary Science programme has five veterinary places (146 applicants for the 2019 entry). Successful completion of this gateway year allows automatic progression onto the five-year BVSc programme.

The university also has a contextual offer policy (A*BC or AAC to include chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths) which is a two grade lower offer than the standard offer. Applications from those with non-traditional backgrounds are welcomed.

What’s the programme like?

Students are hands on with animals from year 1 and benefit from innovative teaching within the university’s acclaimed clinical skills laboratory throughout the programme.

Intercalation is encouraged, with up to 20% of students choosing to do this during their veterinary degree.

Professional studies, animal management, evidence-based veterinary medicine, veterinary public health, and clinical and practical skills are taught in every year of the programme.

  • Years 1 & 2: Preclinical sciences such as anatomy and physiology are taught in integrated units emphasising the clinical relevance.
  • From year 3: Students learn about medicine and surgery, preparing them for their practical clinical training in their final year.
  • The final year: Students work alongside clinical staff and peers to provide veterinary care for a wide range of species. There is also the opportunity for elective study, allowing students to explore clinical work, research and industry.

For further information visit the university website.

How many places are available?

  • 150: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, including graduates and non-UK/non-EU students (no maximum number of either).
  • 11: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (1428 applicants in 2018, 135 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 17: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (135 applicants in 2018, eight students starting the course in 2019).

Work experience requirements

Under normal circumstances, the requirement is for one week within a vet practice and one week in an animal establishment, undertaken within the three years prior to application.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: AAA including chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths, or A*AB including chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths. Contextual offer A*BC or AAC to include chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths.
  • IB: 36 points overall with 18 at Higher Level, including 6, 6 at Higher Level in chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths.
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AA in chemistry and one of biology, physics or maths, and Standard Higher: AAAAB.

Graduate entry

Bristol offers a four-year BVSC Veterinary Science: Accelerated Graduate Entry programme for students with at least an upper second class (2:1) degree in a science subject. This is open to both UK and international applicants and is taught entirely on the Langford campus.


University of Cambridge

Cambridge University

Why apply?

Cambridge is an exciting and welcoming place to train to be a vet, proving graduates with the best clinical and scientific springboard to an enormous range of careers available to them.

All students are members of a college and vet students live in their college for at least the first three years of their course, with the college becoming their major social, sporting and recreational hub.

Widening participation 

During the admissions process, the University of Cambridge has access to a large amount of contextual information about the performance of an applicant’s school and the support the school offers to students aiming for university.

The university’s financial support is also generous. UK students from low-income households receive thousands of pounds each year from the Cambridge Bursary Scheme, as well as having access to a wide variety of hardship funds. These funds can be invaluable for vet students, whose ability to do paid work during university vacations is limited by the need to complete extramural studies. 

What’s the programme like?

If you’re looking for practical experience from day 1, the University of Cambridge promises hands-on experience in handling and management of all the major domestic species from the very first week of your course, as well as integrated sessions in clinical examination, diagnostic imaging and ‘exotic’ species. Veterinary students are also immersed in the scientific environment of the world’s premier science university, with teaching from world experts and the best training available in the scientific basis of clinical practice.

Aa part of their six-year course, all non-graduate-entry students also complete a full Cambridge BA science degree in their third year in a subject of their choice, such as animal disease, conservation biology or management studies.

Students receive continual individualised support and advice, including weekly small-group (two to four students) teaching.

How many places are available?

  • 75: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, including five graduates and no minimum or maximum number of non-UK/non- EU students.
  • 5.5: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (353 applicants in 2018, 64 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 9.5: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (38 applicants in 2018, four students starting the course in 2019).

Work experience requirements

Under normal circumstances, it is recommended that applicants have 10 days of clinical work experience observing veterinary surgeons at work. At interview, applicants may be asked to discuss cases they have seen.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: A*AA: applicants should be taking chemistry and one, preferably two, of biology, maths and physics. Further maths may also be counted (check with the college you are considering applying to first). 
  • IB: a total of 40–42, and 7,7,6 in higher-level or science subjects.
  • SQA Advanced Higher: AAA in Advanced Higher science/maths subjects.

Graduate entry

The University of Cambridge's graduate entry course lasts five years, omitting the third year. Requirements usually include a good Honours degree (at least 2:1; science subjects are desirable) and passes in at least two science/maths A-levels. 

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University of Edinburgh

University of Edinburgh

Why apply?

The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh offers a state-of-the-art, purpose-built campus and an integrated programme of teaching on large animals, small companion animals, exotics and wildlife. You will benefit from a close-knit community of students and a dedicated student support team that takes a personal interest in your wellbeing and success. First-year students also benefit from peer-assisted learning models, with more senior students facilitating discussions with junior students.

Edinburgh itself is a vibrant and cosmopolitan city and is regularly voted as one of the most desirable places to live in the world.

Widening participation 

The University of Edinburgh seeks to attract a wide range of applicants from different social, cultural and educational backgrounds. The contextual admissions system allows the university to consider students' achievements in context. Further information on the university’s widening access offers can be found here.

What’s the programme like?

You will be taught by some of the UK’s most prominent veterinary scientists in an environment of cutting-edge veterinary research and be exposed to a wide range of stimulating teaching and learning methods designed to equip you with the confidence and skills needed for a fulfilling career in veterinary medicine. Studying veterinary medicine at Edinburgh will give you transferable skills such as effective communication, team building and an understanding of business management.

You will gain a qualification that is widely and internationally accredited, allowing you to practise in the UK and elsewhere in the world.

How many places are available?

  • 107: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, including 72 UK/EU students and 35 non-UK/non-EU students.
  • 14: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (981 applicants in 2018, 72 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 6: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (226 applicants in 2018, 35 students starting the course in 2018).

Work experience requirements

The University of Edinburgh does not ask for specific types or a certain amount of work experience. However, applicants should gain both veterinary practice and animal-related work experience.

Typical conditional offers

All candidates must have physics at GCSE/National 5 or equivalent.

  • A-level: AAA, including chemistry, biology and one other university approved subject.
  • IB: an overall score of 38 points with 6,6,6 in chemistry, biology and one other higher-level subject.
  • SQA Higher & Advanced Higher: AAAAB Higher including chemistry (A), biology (A) and either maths or physics to be achieved by the end of S5. If biology has not been studied in S5, it should be taken in S6 to Higher level. BB at Advanced Higher in chemistry and another science subject. 

​Graduate entry

The University of Edinburgh offers a four-year Graduate Entry Programme. Requirements include an upper second class Honours degree or equivalent, or an overall GPA of 3.4 (four-point scale) in an appropriate biological or animal science subject, which includes high grades in prerequisite subjects.

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University of Glasgow

Glasgow University

Why apply?

Voted Scottish University of the Year in 2017, the University of Glasgow’s School of Veterinary Medicine is pre-eminent in teaching, research and clinical provision, and attracts students, researchers and clinicians from around the world.

Founded in 1862, the school is located on the 80-hectare Garscube campus at the north-west boundary of the city, alongside a 190-hectare commercial farm and research centre at Cochno, 15 minutes from Garscube.

The university's veterinary degree has approved status from the American Veterinary Medical Association, meaning graduates have the option of practising in the USA or Canada without the need to sit clinical proficiency examinations.

Widening participation 

The University of Glasgow’s REACH programme works with S4–S6 pupils in 95 schools across the west of Scotland who have an interest in and ability to study a professional degree in veterinary medicine and surgery. All REACH programme applicants who meet the minimum entry requirements in S5 are guaranteed an interview, although this does not guarantee a place on the course.

What’s the programme like?

The BVMS programme integrates clinical and science subject areas and has a spiral course structure, meaning that you will revisit topics as you progress through the programme, with an increasing clinical focus each time. In conjunction, there is a vertical theme of professional and clinical skills development to help students acquire the personal qualities and skills needed in professional environments.

The programme is delivered over five years and is divided into three phases: Foundation phase (years 1 and 2), Clinical phase (years 3 and 4), Professional phase (year 5). In the final year, the main emphasis is on clinical activity, covering the common species of domestic animals. Students will be involved in all aspects of work at the vet school's busy hospitals and will also gain first-hand experience in practices linked to the vet school.

How many places are available?

  • 137: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, including 72 UK/EU students and 65 non-UK/non-EU students.
  • 9: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (510 applicants in 2018, 72 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 7: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (447 applicants in 2018, 65 students starting the course in 2019).

Work experience requirements

Under normal circumstances, the university requires applicants to have six weeks of work experience.  

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: AAA; including chemistry and biology.
  • IB: an overall score of 38 with chemistry at Higher Level 6, biology at Higher Level 6 and maths or physics at Standard Level 5.
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AAAAB at Higher to include chemistry, biology and either physics or maths. BB at Advanced Higher in chemistry and biology.

 

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University of Liverpool

Liverpool University

Why apply?

The University of Liverpool's Institute of Veterinary Science is committed to innovative veterinary education and research, with the aim of giving students a fantastic start to their veterinary careers. Based in 'the friendliest city in the UK', students at the University of Liverpool can experience all aspects of student life while at the city-centre campus, including sports facilities and teams, and a huge range of student societies.

Widening participation 

The University of Liverpool runs a variety of widening participation schemes. It will consider contextual data and make allowances during the admissions process for applicants who meet the criteria for the university's policy on contextual data. Applicants may also receive a reduced offer.

There are two application routes for adult learners who should normally have been out of education for at least five years. Applicants are required to have five GCSEs at grade B (grade 6), including maths, English and science at the time of application. The routes are:

What’s the programme like?

The Institute of Veterinary Science offers in-depth clinical and research-based training across two campuses. Students spend years 1-3 of their course on the Liverpool city campus before moving to the clinical setting of the Leahurst campus on the Wirral Peninsula for years 4-5. Leahurst is home to the vet school's small animal and equine referral hospitals, two farms and its first-opinion equine and farm animal practice (the first-opinion small animal practice is based in Liverpool). Students can access all of these facilities during their course.

The focus is on excellence in clinical practice balanced across the three main disciplines of equine, farm animal and small animal veterinary medicine and surgery.

How many places are available?

  • 165: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, with no minimum or maximum number for graduates or non-UK/non-EU students.
  • 8: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (1227 applicants in 2018, 165 students starting the course in 2019).
  • -: Liverpool regularly admits non-UK/non-EU students and welcomes their applications. No non-UK/non-EU students were admitted in 2019.

Work experience requirements

Under normal circumstances, applicants are advised to obtain work experience with at least two of small, equine or farm animals.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: AAA, including biology and one other science-related subject (e.g. chemistry, maths, geography, physics, psychology), plus a third subject (any subject considered excluding general studies and critical thinking). If the second science is not chemistry, AS-level chemistry is required at grade B.
  • IB: overall 36, to include 6,6,6 in higher-level subjects, including biology and one other science-related subject. If chemistry is not taken at HL it must be taken at SL (grade 6 required).
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AAAAB at Higher, including chemistry and biology. BB at Advanced Higher in chemistry and biology.
  • GCSE (or equivalent): 7776666, including maths, English and two science subjects or, e.g., dual award. 

Graduate entry

Graduate students complete the same five-year course. They are required to have at least an upper second class (2:1) degree and A-levels in biology and chemistry (grades BB for BSc graduates; AA for BA graduates).

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Royal Veterinary College (RVC)

Students at RVC

Why apply?

The Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetMed) programme at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), University of London offers world-leading scientific and clinical training in veterinary medicine. The RVC is internationally accredited and graduates are able to practise as veterinary surgeons in the UK, Europe, Australia and New Zealand, and North America once the licensing examination is passed.

You will gain a thorough understanding of the science underpinning veterinary practice and research, and develop fundamental problem solving, communication and team-working skills. The RVC has the largest small animal hospital in Europe and the busiest exotics practice in the UK.

Widening participation 

The RVC’s Veterinary Gateway course is aimed at students who might not otherwise meet the standard entry requirements due to social, economic or educational barriers. It integrates an additional year designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed to study veterinary medicine.

The RVC aims to place 50 students on this course and typical requirements are five GCSEs at grade 4 (C) and CCC at A-level or equivalent. Applicants must also meet the Route A or Route B requirements.

The RVC also gives contextual offers on its standard BVetMed programme of AAB at A-level or AB at Advanced Higher to those who meet two or more criteria.

What’s the programme like?

The comprehensive programme will help students acquire an understanding of the basic biological principles of normal body function and disease, and the ability to distinguish the pathological from the normal, to prevent disease and safely manage the processes of animal production.

In the first two years, you will be primarily based at the Camden Campus studying basic veterinary sciences, acquiring introductory skills in handling and examining horses, farm animals and companion animals as well as developing your communication and team working skills. In years 3-5 you will be mainly based at the Hawkshead Campus where students will acquire knowledge and practical skills in clinical science necessary to participate fully in clinical practice at the RVC, collaborative practices, and in private veterinary practice.  

How many places are available?

  • 285: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2020/21, including 100 graduates and approximately 125 non-UK/non-EU students.
  • 10: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (1366 applicants in 2018, 134 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 3: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (453 applicants in 2018, 138 students starting the course in 2019)

Work experience requirements

Prior work experience is must, and under normal circumstances, applicants must have a minimum of:

  • 70 hours of work experience (paid or voluntary) in one or more veterinary practices. 

  • 70 hours in one or more non-clinical working environments with live animals (excluding your home environment, family business or pet ownership).

This work experience must be obtained within the 18-month period directly preceding the application deadline. Earlier experience is welcome but will not count towards the requirements.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: AAA, including biology, chemistry and a third subject of the applicant's choice (excluding general studies).
  • IB: 6,6,6 in higher-level biology, chemistry and a third subject of the applicant's choice
  • SQA Advanced Higher: AA in biology and chemistry.

Graduate entry

The RVC offers a four-year BVetMed Graduate Accelerated programme aimed at students with at least an upper second class (2:1) Honours degree in an appropriate biological science subject.

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University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham

Why apply?

The University of Nottingham provides a fresh approach to veterinary education with a progressive and dynamic environment, delivering an outstanding student experience.  The university offers three exciting and innovative veterinary degree courses which are designed with clinical outcomes in mind.

Widening participation 

Contextual offers (AAB in any order) are made to applicants who meet the university's contextual admissions criteria or the Gateway widening participation criteria. More information is available here

What’s the programme like?

The five-year course (D100) is a clinically integrated programme covering all of the common domestic, wildlife and exotic species, bringing you into contact with animals and clinical cases scenarios from the very beginning of your studies. Students spend a lot of their time in the vet school's purpose-built clinical teaching facilities and working with local Clinical Associates, the existing on-site agricultural facilities and the adjacent Animal and Plant Health Agency laboratory.

The six-year course (D104) includes a Preliminary Year, which provides students with the relevant knowledge of biology, chemistry, animal health and husbandry required for laters years of the course.

A second six-year course (D190) includes a Gateway Year, which provides an opportunity to upskill capable students who might not otherwise consider entry into the profession. Students gain relevant scientific knowledge required for the later years of the course including animal structure, function, health and husbandry. 

How many places are available?

  • 300: The target number of places for 2021/2022, split over two intakes of 150 students in September 2021 and April 2022.
  • 10: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (1,493 applicants in 2018, 253 students starting the course in 2019/20).
  • 14: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2019 (112 applicants in 2018, eight students starting the course in 2019/20).

Work experience requirements

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, applications will not be negatively affected if applicants have been unable to complete planned work experience.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: A in biology, A in chemistry, B in a third subject (excluding general studies, critical thinking, global perspectives and citizenship studies).
  • IB: a total of 34, with 6 in biology, 6 in chemistry, 5 in a third subject at higher level.
  • SQA Advanced Higher: AA in Advanced Higher biology and chemistry.

 Graduate entry

​The University of Nottingham does not offer a specific graduate-entry route to veterinary medicine. Science graduates are welcome to apply for the five-year D100 course. Typical entry requirements are an upper second class (2:1) BSc degree, supported by B grades in both biology and chemistry at A-level. Applicants must also have a minimum of grade B in GCSE maths and English.

 

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University of Surrey 

Surrey vet school

Why apply?

The University of Surrey's veterinary school was founded in 2015 and its first vets qualified in 2019 with a Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Science (BVMSci) degree. The modern and innovative practical training and partnership-based teaching are designed to build your confidence from day 1 and allow you to understand the range of career opportunities open to you.

The Manor Park Campus in Guildford offers access to libraries, clubs, local markets and outdoor spaces, and hosts the £36 million Surrey Sports Park, one of Europe's leading sports facilities.

Wellbeing initiatives include Surrey Peer Support and Vet Families, run by student volunteers trained in welcoming and supporting new and existing students in the vet school.

Widening participation 

In2Surrey is the University of Surrey's access scheme and offers benefits to support students who are under-represented in higher education. These include a reduction in entry requirements (equivalent to one A-level grade lower) and a scholarship. The university also offers a range of bursaries to support eligible students financially during their studies. 

What’s the programme like?

Year 1 of the veterinary course is spent studying topics that are fundamental to veterinary medicine, including anatomy, physiology, animal husbandry, cells and genes. In year 2, teaching covers epidemiology, infectious diseases and pathology, and there are some practical sessions taught off campus at Surrey Wildlife Trust, Chichester, Merrist Wood and Sparsholt College.

In year 3, the focus is on clinical medicine and surgery, diagnostic techniques, pharmacology and scientific communication. Subjects studied in year 4 include anaesthesia, surgery and patient care and contemporary issues in veterinary and zoological medicine. There is also a rotating cycle of small-group practical workshops visiting external partners.

The final year is spent with Surrey's external partner network of veterinary practices and at the Surrey-based Veterinary Pathology Centre. Students become immersed in real practice life in small animal, farm and equine clinics, and return to university regularly for professional practice teaching.

How many places are available?

  • 150: The target number of places on the main (non-Gateway) veterinary course for 2021 with no minimum or maximum limit on the number of graduate applicants and non-UK/non-EU students.
  • 8: The number of UK/EU applicants per place in 2019 (1171 applicants in 2018, 144 students starting the course in 2019).
  • 17: The number of non-UK/non-EU applicants per place in 2018 (86 applicants in 2018, three students starting the course in 2019).

Work experience requirements 

Applicants are expect to have gained at least four weeks' animal-related work experience, including a week in general veterinary practice, before 15 January 2021. Experience could include farm, stable yard, kennels, rescue centre, research laboratory or abattoir work and a broad range of experience is an advantage. 

Typical conditional offers

  • GCSE (or equivalent): Minimum of five subjects at grade A(7) or above to include chemistry, biology and physics (or double science). Maths and English language are required with a minimum of grade B(5).  All applicants are required to meet the minimum GCSE requirements.
  • A-level: AAB, including biology and chemistry at grade A.
  • IB: 34 points to include 6 in Higher Level biology and chemistry.
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AAABB at Higher and Advanced Higher, including biology and chemistry at grade A.
  • BTEC: DDD in an animal/science related subject area, plus grade A in A-level chemistry.

Graduate entry

Surrey welcomes graduate entry candidates who require at least an upper second class (2:1) degree in a bioscience-related subject (A-level grades may also be assessed if the candidate's degree does not meet the biology and chemistry requirements). 

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Harper & Keele Veterinary School 

[Yet to be accredited]

Harper & Keele Veterinary School

Why apply?

The new Harper & Keele Veterinary School is due to admit its first students in 2020. The curriculum at the school has been designed to enhance the confidence, capability and resilience of its veterinary graduates. The vet school offers a team teaching approach, with a core of permanent vet school staff supplemented by practising vets to ensure that graduates are ready to enter work in first-opinion practice. Students will be split equally between both Harper Adams University and Keele University, with lectures simultaneously live-streamed to the other site. A shuttle bus will provide free transport between sites when access to specialist facilities is needed.

Widening participation 

A contextualised offer scheme is in operation and there are a variety of alternative routes to studying veterinary medicine at Harper & Keele. More details can be found here

What’s the programme like?

The course is highly practical and clinically focused from the outset. A 'spiral curriculum' means students study key concepts in relevant clinical contexts and revisit them over the course of their degree with increasing complexity each time. The final year is mostly spent on clinical rotations hosted by veterinary practice partners, with individual days or weeks back on the host site for tutorials.

Work experience requirements

At present, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Harper & Keele is not stipulating a minimum number of weeks of work experience that must be gained. Under normal circumstances, suggested experience to aim for includes two weeks in one or more veterinary practices (ideally covering both large and small animal experience) and up to four weeks in a mixture of non-clinical placements, including farms, stables, kennels, catteries, veterinary or medical laboratories and pathology services and abattoirs.

Typical conditional offers

A wide range of qualifications are considered suitable for entry to the course.

  • A-level: AAB, including grade A in biology or chemistry, plus grade A in a second science subject and grade B in a third subject of your choice (excluding general studies and critical thinking).
  • IB: 34 points, to include 6,6,6 at Higher Level, including biology and chemistry, plus a second science subject and a third subject of your choice. Also a minimum of 5,5,5 at Standard Level.
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AA in biology or chemistry at Advanced Higher, AABBB minimum at Higher level, including biology and chemistry.
  • BTEC: D*D*D* in animal management with science/ applied science
  • GCSE (or equivalent): A minimum of five GCSEs at grade A(7) or above, including science and additional science (or biology and chemistry), plus at least grade B(6) in English language, maths and physics (if taken as a separate GCSE).

Graduate entry

Graduate entrants normally require at least an upper second class (2:1) honours degree plus a minimum of BBB at A-level, including biology or chemistry. Students with good degrees (1st or 2:1) in an animal-related or bioscience discipline who do not meet the A-level requirements are welcome to apply and will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

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Aberystwyth University

[Yet to be accredited]

 

Why apply?

The School of Veterinary Science at Aberystwyth University is the first vet school in Wales and will welcome its first students from September 2021. The BVSc veterinary science degree is being delivered in collaboration with the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) and the course will combine the scientific and clinical expertise of both institutions. It is especially appealing to those interested in veterinary careers within Wales or in rural mixed practice.

Widening participation 

Widening participation criteria will follow those of the RVC (see above). 

What’s the programme like?

The first two years of the course will be based at Aberystwyth University, where the focus will be on the biology underpinning veterinary sciences and acquiring basic farm animal, equine and companion animal handling and examination skills, and developing communication, problem solving and team working skills.

The third, fourth and fifth years will be spent at the RVC's Hawkshead Campus in Hertfordshire. Here, students will acquire the clinical knowledge and practical skills needed to register as veterinarians. There will also be a specific rotation at Aberystwyth University focused on production animal issues relevant to Wales.

How many places will be available?

There will be 25 places on offer for 2021.

Work experience requirements

For those applying for entry in 2021 only, the following work experience requirements must be met:

  • 35 hours of work experience in one or more veterinary practices
  • 35 hours of work experience outside of a veterinary practice.

In normal circumstances, 70 hours of work experience in each setting will be required.

Typical conditional offers

  • A-level: AAA including A grades in biology and chemistry, plus a third subject of your choice (not overlapping with biology or chemistry). 
  • IB: 7,6,6 at Higher Level, including biology, chemistry and a third subject of your choice.
  • SQA Higher and Advanced Higher: AA in chemistry and biology at Advanced Higher and AAAAB at Higher, including biology and chemistry.
  • Welsh Baccalaureate: Applicants who achieve the Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate with grade A will be accepted with A-level grade A in biology and chemistry.

Details of other academic requirements suitable for entry to the BVSc programme can be found here

 

[*All information provided was correct at the time of collation. More information is available on each school’s individual websites.]

 

 

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